Syllabus For The Subject Design of Steel Structure


CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
1.1    STRUCTURAL DIESIGN
1.2    TYPES OF STRUCTURES
1.3    STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS
1.4    BEAMS AND GIRDERS
1.5    TENSION MEMBERS
1.6    CMPRESSION MEMBERS
1.7    STRUCTURAL STEEL
1.8    STRUCTURAL STEEL SECTIONS
1.9    METHODS OF DESIGN
1.10    STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS AND CODES OF PRACTICE
1.11    MERITS AND DEMERITS OF CONSTRUCTION IN STRUCTURAL STEEL
TER 2 LOADS AND STRESSES
2.1 INTRODUCTION
2.2 DEAD LOADS
2.3 LIVE LOADS
2.4 WIND LOADS
2.5 EARTHQUAKE FORCES
2.6 SOIL AND HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES
2.7 OTHER FORCES
2.8 LOAD COMBINATIONS
2.9 STRESS STRAIN RELATIONSHIP FOR MILD STEEL
2.10 FACTOR OF SAFETY
2.11 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES
TER 3 STEEL WORK CONNECTIONS: I RIVETED CONNCETIONS
3.1 TYPES OF CONNECTIONS
3.2 RIVET AND RIVETING
3.3 RIVET SIZE , RIVET HOLE AND CONVENTIONAL SYMBOLS
3.4 COMMON DEFINITIONS
3.5 WORKING STRESSES IN RIVETS
3.6 TYPES OF RIVETD JOINTS
3.7 MODES F FAILURE OF A RIVETED JOINT
3.8 STRENGTH OF RIVETED JOINT
3.9 DESIGN OF RIVETED JOINT: AXIAL AXIAL LOAD
3.10 RIVETED JOINT IN FRAMED STRUCTURES
3.11 RIVETED JOINTS IN CYLINDRICAL AND SPHERICAL SHEELS
3.12 RIVETED JOINT SUBJECTED TO MEMENT ACTING IN HE PLANE OF THE JOINT
3.13 RIVETED JOINT SUBJECTED TO MEMENT ACTING PERPENDICULAR TO THE PLANE OF JOINT

CHAPTER 4 STEELWORK CONNECTIONS:II BOLTED & PINNED CONNECTIONS
4.1 INTRODUCTION
4..2 BOLT TYPES
4.3 ORDINARY UNFINISHED OR BLACK BOLTS
4.4 TURNED AND FITTED BOLTS
4.5 HIGH STRENGTH FRICTION GRIP BOLTS
4.6 PROOF LOADS OF HTFG BLTS
4.7 TYPES OF BOLTED CONN ECTIONS
4.8 DESIGN OF BOLUTE SHEAR CONNECTION
4.9 BOLTS SUBJECTED TO EXTERNAL TENSION
4.10 COMBINED SHEAR AND TENSION
4.11 INSTALLATION OF HTFG BOLTS
4.12 PINNED CONNECTIONS

CHAPTER -5 STEELWORK CONNECTIONS: III WELDED CONNECTIONS
5.1 INTRODUCTION
5.2 ADVANTAGES OF WELDING
5.3 DISADVANTAGES OF WELDING
5.4 TYPES OF WELDS AND WELDED JOINTS
5.5 BUTT WELD OR GROOVE WELD
5.6 FILLET WELDS  
5.7 DEFECTS IN WELDING
5.8 WORKING STRESSES IN WELDS
5.9 DESIGN OF FILET WELDS FOR AXIAL LOADS
5.10 FILLET WELDING OF UNSYMMETRICAL SECTIONS AXIAL LOAD
5.11 DESIGN OF BUTT WELDS
5.12 DESIGN OF PLUG AND SLOT WELDS
5.13 ECCENTRICALLY LOADED FILLET WELDED JOINTS
5.14 ECCENTRICALLY LOADED BUTT WELDED JOINTS

CHAPTER-6 DESIGN OF TENSION MEMBERS
6.1 INTRODUCTION
6.2 TYPES OF TENSION MEMBERS
6.3 NET SECTIONAL AREA: PLATES
6.4 NET EFFECTIVE AREA FOR ANGLES AND TEES IN TENSION
6.5 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES
6.6 DESIGN OF MEMBERS SUBJECTED TO AXIAL TENSION
6.7 DESIGN OF MEMBERS SUBJECTED TO AXIAL TENSION AND BENDING
6.8 TENSION SPLICES
6.9 LUG ANGLE

CHAPTER 7 DESIGN OF COMPRESSION MEMBERS
7.1 INTRODUCTION
7.2 MODES OF FAILURE OF A COLUMN
7.3 BUCKING FAILURE : EULER’S THEORY
7.4 IDEAL END CONDITTIONS AND EFFECTIVE
7.5 PRACTICAL END CONDITIONS AND EFFECTIVE LENGTH FACTORS
7.6 RADIUS OF GYRATION AND SLENDERNESS RATIO
7.7 VARIOUS COLUMN FORMULAE
7.8 DESIGN FORMULA: I.S. CODE FORMULA
7.9 COMMON SHAPES OF COMPRESSION MEMBERS
7.10 STRENGTH OF COMPRESSION MEMBERS
7.11 GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR COMPRESSION MEMBERS
7.12 DESIGN OF COMPRESSION MEMBERS
7.13 DESIGN OF BUILT-UP COMPRESSION MEMBERS: LACED AND BATTENED COLUMNS
7.14 LACINGS
7.15 BATTEN PLATES
7.16 PERFORATED COVER PLATES
7.17 COLUMN SPLICES
7.18 ENCASED COLUMNS

CHAPTER-8 DESIGN OF FLECURAL MEMBERS : BEAMS
8.1 INTRODUCTION
8.2 MODES OF FAILURE: CRITERIA FOR DESIGN
8.3 BENDING STRESS
8.4 SHEAR STRESS
8.5 BEARING STRESS
8.6 DEFLECTION OF STRESSES
8.7 COMBINATION OF STRESSES
8.8 LATERALLY SUPPORTED BEAMS
8.9 DESIGN OF LATERALLY SUPPORTED BEAM
8.10 LATERALLY UNSUPPORTED BEAM
8.11 DESIGN OF LATERALLY UNSUPPORTED BEAM
8.12 WEB CRIPPLING
8.13 SSSSSWEB BUCKING
8.14 BULT-UP BEAMS
8.15 DESIGN OF UNSYMMETRICALLY PLATED BEAMS
8.16 DESIGN OF UNSYMMETRICALLY PLATED BEAMS
8.17 DESIGN OF DEPENDED BEAM
8.18 DESIGN OF LINTELS
8.19 ENCASED BEAMS
8.20 FILLER JOIST FLOORS
8.21 JACK ARCH ROOF

CHAPTER – 9 GANTRY GIRDERS
9.1 INTRODUCTION
9.2 LOADS ACTING ON GANTRY GIRDER
9.3 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES
9.4 TYPES OF GANTRY GIRDERS AND CRANE RAILS
9.5 CRANE DATA
9.6 MAXIMUM MOMENTS AND SHEARS
9.7 CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
9.8 DESIGN PROCEDURE

CHAPTER-10 BEAM COLUMNS
10.1 INTRODUCTION
10.2 MOMENT MAGNIFICATION:
         DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION APPROACH
10.3 MOMENT MAGNIFICATION: SIMLIFIED TREATMENT
10.4 COMPRESSIVE LOAD WITH UNIXIAL BENDING INTERACTION EQUATION
10.5 INTERACTION EQUATION FOR BIAXIAL BENDING
10.6 DESIGN PROCEDURE

CHAPTER-11 DESIGN OF COLUMN BASES AND FOOTINGS
11.1 INTRODUCTION
11.2 SLAB BASES
11.3 GUSSETED BASES
11.4 MOMENT RESISTANT BASES FOR COLUMNS
11.5 ATTACHED BASE PLATE WITH INITIALLY TENSIONED BOLTS
11.6 ATTACHED BASE WITH UNTENSIONED BOLTS
11.7 UNATTACHED BASES
11.8 BASES SUBJECTED TO BENDING ABOUT TWO AXES
11.9 COLUMN FOUNDATIONS
11.10 INDEPENDENT GRILLAGE FOUNDATIONS
11.11 COMBINED GRILLAGE FOOTING

CHAPTER 12 RIVETED BEAM CONNECTIONS
12.1 TYPES OF BEAM CONNECTINS
12.2 SIMPLE BEAM END CONNECTIONS
12.3 DESIGN OF FRAMED BEAM CONNECTION
12.4 DESIGN OF UNSTIFFEND SEAT CONNECTIONS
12.5 DESIGN OF STIFFENED SEAT CONNECTIONS
12.6 MOMENT RESISTANT CONNECTIONS
12.7 SMALL MOMENT RESISTANT CONNECTIONS: CLIP ANGLE CONNECTIONS
12.8 LARGE MOMENT RESISTANT CONNECTIONS
12.9 BEHAVIOUR OF RIVETED JOINT

CHAPTER 13 WELDED BEAM CONNECTIONS
13.1 TYPES OF WELDED BEAM CONNECTIONS
13.2 DIRECT WEB FILLET WELDED CONNECTIONS
13.3 DIRECT WEB BUTT WELDED CONNECTION
13.4 WELDED DOUBLE PLATE FRAMED CONNECTION
13.5 WELDED DOUBLE ANGLE FRAMED CONNECTION
13.6 UNSTIFFENED WELDED SEAT CONNECTION
13.7 STIFFENED WELDED SEAT CONNECTION
13.8 MOMENT RESISTANT WELDED CONNECTIONS
CHAPTER 14 DESIGNS OF PLATE GIRDERS
14.1 INTRODUCTION
14.2 COMPONENTS OF A PLTE GIRDER
14.3 DESIGN ELEMENTS
14.4 SELF WEIGHT AND ECONOMICAL DEPTH
14.5 IMPACT FACTOR
14.6 BASIC DESIGN ASSUMPTIONS
14.7 DESIGN OF WEB PLATE
14.8 DESIGN OF FLANGES
14.9 CURTAILMENT OF FLANGE PLATES
14.10 CONNECTION OF FLANGE ANGLES TO WEB
14.11 CONNECTION OF FLANGE ANGLE TO COVER PLATE
14.12 INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL STIFFENERS
14.13 HORIZONTAL STIFFENERS
14.14 BEARING STIFFENERS
14.15 WEB SPLICES
14.16 FLANGE SPLICES
14.17 DESIGN OF RIVETED PLATE GIRDER
14.18 DESIGN OF WELDED PLATE GIRDER

CHAPTER-15 UNSYMMETRICAL BENDING
15.1 INTRODUCTION
15.2 CENTROIDAL PRINCIPAL AXES OF A SECTION
15.3 GRAPHICAL METHOD FOR LOCATING PRINCIPAL AXES
15.4 MOMENTS OF INERTIA PEFERRED TO ANY SET OF RECTANGULAR AXES
15.5 BENDING STRESS IN BEAM SUBJECTED TO UNSYMMETRICAL BENDING
15.6 RESOLUTION OF BENDING MOMENT INTO TWO COMPONENTS ALONG PRINCIPAL AXES
15.7 RESOLUTION OF B.M. INTO ANY TWO RECTANGULAR AXES THROUGH THE CENTROID
 15.8 LOCATION OF NEUTRAL AXIS
15.9 GRAPHICAL METHOD: MOMENTAL ELLIPSE
15.10 THE Z-POLYGON
15.11 DEFLECTION OF BEAM UNDER UNSYMMETRICAL BENDING

CHAPTER 16 DESIGNS OF ROOF TRUSSES
16.1 INRODUCTION
16.2 TYPES OF ROOF TRUSSES
16.3 COMPONENTS OF A ROOF TRUSS
16.4 ECONOMICAL SPACING OF ROOF TRUSSES
16.5 SPACING OF PURLINS
16.6 SAG RODS FOR PURLINS
16.7 LATERAL BRACING OF END TRUSSES
16.8 ROOF COVERINGS
16.9 LOADS ON ROOF TRUSSES
16.10 DESIGN OF ROOF TRUSS
16.11 DESIGN OF ROOF TRUSS

CHAPTER-17 DESIGN OF ROUND TUBULAR STRUCTURES
17.1 INTRODUCTION
17.2 SECTIONAL PROPERTIES OF ROUND TUBES
17.3 GRADES OF STEEL TUBES
17.4 TUBULAR TENSION MEMBERS
17.5 TUBULAR COMPRESSION MEMBERS
17.6 TUBULAR FLEXURAL MEMBERS
17.7 COMBINED BENDING AND AXIAL STRESSES
17.8 TUBULAR TRUSSES
17.9 CONNECTIONS

CHAPTER 18- DESIGN IN LIGHT GAUGE STEEL
18.1 INTRODUCTION
18.2 FORMS OF LIGHT-GAUGE SECTIONS
18.3 SHAPES FOR DECKS AND PANELS
18.4 IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS
18.5 LOCAL BUCKLING OF THIN ELEMENTS
18.6 EFFECTIVE DESIGN WIDTH OF STIFFENED COMPRESSION ELEMENTS
18.7 MULTIPLE STIFFENED COMPRESSION ELEMENTS
18.8 BASIC DESIGN STRESS (IS: 801-1975)
18.9 COMPRESSION ON UNSTIFFENED ELEMENTS
18.10 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE OVERALL FLAT-WIDTH RATOIS
18.11 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WEB DEPTH
18.12 PROPERTIES OF SECTIONS
18.13 AXIALLY LOADED COMPRESSION MEMEBERS
18.14 LATERALLY SUPPORTED BEAMS
18.15 LATERALLY UNSUPPORTED OR UNBRACED BEAMS
18.16 CONNECTIONS

CHAPTER 19 DESIGNS OF STEEL CHIMNEYS
19.1 INTRODUCTION
19.2 DIMENSIONS OF STELL STACKS
19.3 CHIMNEY LINING
19.4 BREECH OPENINGS AND ACCESS LADDER
19.5 LOADING AND LOAD COMBINATIONS
19.6 DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
19.7 STABILITY CONSIDERATIONS
19.8 DESIGN OF BASE PLATE
19.9 DESIGN OF FOUNDATION BOLTS
19.10 DESIGN OF FOUNDATION

CHAPTER 20 DESIGNS OF STEEL TANKS
20.1 INTRODUCTION
20.2 DESIGN LOADS
20.3 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES
20.4 THICKNESS OF METAL (IS:805-1969)
20.5 STAND PIPES
20.6 CYLINDRICAL TANKS WITH SUPENDED BOTTOM
20.7 STRESSES IN SPHERICAL BOTTOM
20.8 STRESSES IN CONICAL BOTTOM
20.9 STRESSES IN CONNECTION BETWEEN SIDE AND BOTTOM PLATES
20.10 SUPPORTING RING BEAM
20.11 STAGING FOR CYLINDRICAL TANKS
20.12 RECTANGULAR ELEVATED TANKS
20.13 RECTANGULAR PRESSESD STEEL TANKS
20.14 DESIGN EXAMPLES

CHAPTER 21 DESIGNS OF TOWERS AND MASTS
21.1 INTRODUCTION
21.2 LATTICE TOWER CONFIGURATIONS AND BRACINGS
21.3 LOADS ACTING ON LATTICE TOWERS
21.4 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF LATTICE TOWERS
21.5 MASTS
21.6 TRANSMISSION LINE TOWERS
21.7 LOADS ON TRANSMISSION LINE TOWERS
21.8 EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE VARIATION ON CONDUCTORS AND EARTH WIRES
21.9 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF TRANSMISSION LINE TOWERS
21.10 FOUNDATIONS FOR TOWERS

CHAPTER-22 INFLUENCE LINES FOR STRESSES IN FRAMES
22.1 INTRODUCTION
22.2 PRATT TRUSS WITH PARALLEL CHORDS
22.3 PRATT TRUSS WITH INCLINED CHORDS
22.4 WARREN TRUSS WITH INCLINED CHORDS
22.5 WAREN TRUSS WITH INCLINED CHORDS
22.6 K-TRUSS
22.7 BALTIMORE TRUSS WITH SUB-TIES: THROUGH TYPE
22.8 BALTIMORE TRUSS WITH SUB-TIES:DECK TYPE
22.9 BALTIMORE TRUSS WITH SUB-STRUTS: THROUGH TYPE
22.10 PENNSYLVANIA OR PETTIT TRUSS WITH SUB-TIES
22.11 PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS WITH SUB-STRUTS
22.12 BRACED CANTILEVER WITH SUSPENDED SPAN GIRDER

CHAPTER 23 SPACE FRMES
23.1 INTRODUCTION
23.2 METHOD OF TENSION COEFFICIENTS APPLIED TO SPACE FRAMES
23.3 ILLISTRATIVE EXAMPLES

CHAPTER 24 MULTI-STORY BUILDING
24.1 INTRODUCTION: BUILDING FRAMES
24.2 BRCING OF MULTISTOREY BUILDING FRAMES
24.3 DIAPHRAGMS, SHEAR WALLS OR CORES
24.4 TUBE STRUCTURES
24.5 SUBSTITUTE FRAMES
24.6 ANALYSIS FOR VERTICAL LOADS
24.7 METHODS OF COMPUTING B.M
24.8 ANALYSIS OF FRAMES SUBJECTED TO HORIZONTAL FORCES
24.9 PORTAL METHOD
24.10 CANTILEVER METHOD
24.11 FACTOR METHOD

CHAPTER 25 INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS
25.1 INTRODUCTION
25.2 PLANNING AND STRUCTURAL FRAMING
25.3 MAJOR COMPONENTS OF AN INDUSTRIAL BUILDING
25.4 BRACING OF INDUSTRIAL BUILDING  
25.5 BRACING OF INDUSTRIAL BENTS IN TRANSVERSE DIRECTION
25.6 ANALYSIS OF BRACED BENTS

CHAPTER 26 PLASTIC ANALYSES AND DESIGN
26.1 INTRODUCTION
26.2 THE DUCTILITY OF STEEL
26.3 ULTIMATE LOAD CARRYING CAPACITY OF MEMBERS CARRYING AXIAL TENSION
26.4 PLASTIC BENDING OF BEAMS
26.5 STAGES OF BENDING OF RECTANGULAR SECTIONS
26.6 EVALUATION OF FULLY PLASTIC MOMENT
26.7 EVALUATION OF SHAPE FACTOR
26.8 MOMENTS-CURVATURE RELATIONSHIPS
26.9 PLASTIC HINGE
26.10 LOAD FACTOR
26.11 CONDITIONS AND BASIC THEOREMS OF PLASTIC ANALYSIS
26.12 DETERMINATION OF COLLAPSE LOAD FOR SOME STANDARD CASES OF BEAMS
26.13 PORTAL FRAMES
26.14 DESIGN RECOMMENDRATIONS

CHAPTER -27 BRIDGES I : GENERAL
27.1 INTRODUCTION
27.2 SOME DEFINITIONS
27.3 CLASSIFICATION OF STEEL BRIDGES
27.4 ECONOMICAL SPAN LENGTH
27.5 CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS
27.6 DIMENSIONS OF ROLLING STOCK
27.7 WIDTH OF ROADWAY AND FOOTWAY

CHAPTER- 28 BRIDGES II: LOADS AND STRESSES
28.1 LOADS AND FORCES
28.2 DEAD LOAD
28.3 LIVE LOAD FOR RAILWAY BRIDGES
28.4 LIVE LOAD FOR HIGHWAY BRIDGES
28.5 LIVE LOAD ON COMBINED RAIL-ROAD BRIDGES
28.6 IMPACT EFFECT
28.7 WIND LOAD
28.8 LATERAL LOADS: RACKING FORCE
28.9 LONGITUDINAL FORCES   
28.10 CENTRIFUGAL FORCE
28.11 SEISMIC LOADS
28.12 TEMPERATURE EFFECTS
28.13 ERECTION EFFECTS
28.14 COMBINATION OF LOADS AND FORCES
28.15 PRIMARY, SECONDARY AND DEFORMATION STRESSES
28.16 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES

CHAPTER-29 BRIDGES III: PLATE GIRDER BRIDGES
29.1 INTRODUCTION: SOLID WEB GIRDERS
29.2 DECK TYPE PLATE GIRDER BRIDGE FOR RAILWAYS
29.3 HALF-THROUGH PLATE GIRDER BRIDGE FOR RAILWAYS
29.4 FLOOR SYSTEM FOR RAILWAY BRIDGES
29.5 SELF-WEIGHT OF PLATE GIRDER
29.6 DESIGN OF PLATE GIRDERS FOR DECK TYPE RAILWAY BRIDGES
29.7 DESIGN OF LOAD BEARING ELEMENTS OF THROUGH AND HALF THROUGH TYPE RAILWAY BRIDGES
29.8 WIND LOAD ON PLATE GIRDER BRIDGES FOR RAILWAYS
29.9 OVERTURNING EFFECTS DUE TO WIND LOAD
29.10 HORIZONTAL TRUSS EFFECT
29.11 GENERAL ARRANGEMENT FOR HIGHWAY PLATE GIRDER BRIDGES
29.12 IRC RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF PLATE GIRDER BRIDGES

CHAPTER 30 BRIDGES IV: TRUSS GIRDER BRIDGES
30.1 INTRODUCTION
30.2 GENERAL ARRANGEMENT OF COMPONENTS OF TRUSS GIRDER BRIDGE
30.3 TYPES OF TRUSS GIRDERS
30.4 ECONOMIC PROPORTIONS OF TRUSS BRIDGE
30.5 SELF WEIGHT OF TRUSS GIRDER
30.6 DESIGN OF COMPRESSION MEMBERS
30.7 DESIGN OF TENSION MEMBERS
30.8 WIND LOAD AND WIND EFFECT ON TRUSS GIRDER BRIDGES
30.9 OVERTURNING EFFECT
30.10 TOP LATERAL BRACING
30.11 BOTTOM LATERAL BRACING
30.12 ANALYSIS OF PORTAL BRACING
30.13 SWAY BRACING

CHAPTER -31 BRIDGES V: END BEARINGS
31.1 INTRODUCTION: FUNCTIONS
31.2 I.S. CODE REQUIREMENTS FOR BEARINGS
31.3 TYPES OF BEARINGS
31.4 SLIDING BEARINGS OR PLATE BEARINGS
31.5 ROCKER BEARINGS
31.6 ROLLER BEARING
31.7 KNUCKLE PIN BEARING
31.8 RAILWAY BOARD ROLLER BEARING
31.9 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES ON BEARINGS (IS: 191-1961)
31.10 ELASTOMERIC BEARINGS

CHAPTER 32 TIMBER STRUCTURES
32.1 INTRODUCTION
32.2 KNOTS, WANES CHECKS AND SHAKES
32.3 SLOPE OF GRAIN
32.3 SLOPE OF GRAIN
32.4 CLASSIFICATION AND GRADING OF TIMBER
32.5 FACTORS OF SAFETY
32.6 PERMISSIBLE STRESSES
32.7 NET SECTION
32.8 FLEXURAL MEMBERS
32.9 FLITCHED BEAM
32.10 TIMBER COLUMNS AND STRUTS
32.11 MEMBERS SUBJECTED TO BENDING AND AXIAL STRESSES
32.12 TIMBER TENSION MEMBERS
32.13 JOINTS IN TIMBER MEMBERS
32.14 BOLTED JOINTS IN TIMBER
32.15 NAILED JOINTS IN TIMBER
32.16 DISC-DOWELLED JOINT IN TIMBER

CHAPTER 33 DESIGNS OF MASONRY STRUCTURES
33.1 INTRODUCTION
33.2 GENERAL CONDITIONS OF STRENGTH AND STABILITY OF MASONRY STRUCTURES
33.3 LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE ON RETAINING WALLS
33.4 DESIGN OF GRAVITY RETAINING WALL
33.5 MASNRY DAMS
33.6 MASONRY CHIMNEYS

 

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