Syllabus For The Subject Mechatronics

 

  MECHATRONICS

CHAPTER 1: Introduction to Metronics

1.1   Historical perspective

1.2   Key elements of a mechatronic system

1.3   Some examples of mechatronic system

CHAPTER 2: Electrical Components and Circuits

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Electrical components

2.3 Resistive circuit

2.4 Sinusoidal source and complex impedance 

CHAPTER 3: Semiconductor Electronics Device

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Covalent bonds and doping material

3.3 The p-n junction and the diode effects

3.4 The Zanier diode

3.5 Power supplies

3.6 Active components 

CHAPTER 4: Digital Electronics

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Number system

4.3 Combinational logic design using truth tablets

4.4 Karnaugh map sand logic designs

4.5 Combinational logic modules

4.6 Timing Diagrams

4.7 Sequential logic design

4.8 Sequential logic components

4.9 Applications of flip-flops

CHAPTER 5: Analog Electronics

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Amplifiers

5.3 The idea operational amplifiers models

5.4 The inverting amplifier

5.5 The non-inverting amplifier

5.6 The unity-gain buffer

5.7 The summing amplifier

5.8 The difference amplifier

5.9 The instrumentation amplifier

5.10 The integrator amplifier

5.11 The differentiator amplifier

5.12 The comparator

5.13 The sample and hold amplifier

5.14 Active filters 

CHAPTER 6: Microcomputers and Microcontrollers

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Microcontroller

6.3The PICI6F84 microcontroller

6.4Programming a PIC using assembly language

6.5 Programmer a PIC using C

6.6 Interfacing common PIC peripheries: the PIC Millennium board

6.7 The PIC16F877 microcontroller

6.8 Interfacing to the PIC

6.9 Communicating with the PIC during programming 

CHAPTER 7: Data Acquisition

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Sampling and aliasing

7.3 Quantization theory

7.4 Digital-to-analog conversation hardware

7.5 Analog-to-digital conversation hardware 

CHAPTER 8: Sensors

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Distance sensors

8.3 Movements sensors

8.4 Proximity sensors

8.5 Electrical strain and stress measurement

8.6 Force measurement

8.7 Time of flight sensors

8.8 Binary force sensors

8.9 Temperature measurement

8.10 Pressure measurement 

Chapter 9: Electrical actuator system

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Moving-iron transducers

9.3 Solenoids

9.4 Relays

9.5 Electric motors

9.6 Direct current motors

9.7 Dynamics model and control of d.c. motors

9.8 The Servo motors

9.9 The steppers motors

9.10 Motors selection 

CHAPTER: 10 Mechanical actuator systems

10.1 Hydraulic and pneumatic system

10.2 Mechanical elements

10.3 Kinematic elements

10.4 Cam mechanics

10.5 Gears

10.6 Ratchet mechanics

10.7 Flexible mechanical elements

10.8 Friction clutches

10.9 Design of cloches

10.10 Brakes 

CHAPTER: 11 Interfacing Microcontrollers with Actuators

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Interfacing with general-purpose three-state transistors

11.3 Interfacing relays

11.4 Interfacing solenoids

11.5 Interfacing steppers motors

11.6 Interfacing permanent magnet motors

11.7 Interfacing sensors

11.8 Interfacing with a DAC

11.9 Interfacing power supplies

11.10 Interfacing with RS 232 and RS 485

11.11 Compatibility at an interface

CHAPTER: 12 Control Theory: Modeling

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Modeling in the frequency domain

12.3 Modeling in the time domain

12.4 Converting a transfer function to state space

12.5 Converting a state-space representation to a transfer function

12.6 Block diagram 

CHAPTER: 13 Control Theories: Analysis

13.1 Introduction

13.2 System response

13.3 Dynamic characteristics of a control system

13.4 Zero-order system

13.5 First-order system

13.6 Second-order system

13.7 General second-order transfer function

13.8 System modeling and interdisciplinary analogies

13.9 Stability

13.10 The Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion

13.11 Steady-state errors

CHAPTER: 14 Control Theories: Graphical Techniques

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Roots locus

14.3 Frequency response techniques

CHAPTER: 15 Robotic Systems

15.1 Types of robot

15.2 Robotic arm terminal

15.3 Robotic arm configuration

15.4 Robot application

15.5 Basic robotic system

15.6 Robotic manipulator kinematics

15.7 Robotic arm positioning concepts

15.8 Robotic arm path planning

15.9 Actuators 

CHAPTER: 16 Integrated Circuit and Printed Circuit Board Manufacture

16.1 Integrated circuit fabrication

16.1 Printed circuit board

CHAPTER:17 Reliability

17.1 The meaning of reliability

17.2 The life curve

17.3 Repairable and non-repairable system

17.4 Failure or hazard rate models

17.5 Reliability system

17.6 Response surface modeling 

CHAPTER: 18 Case Studies

18.1 Introduction

18.2 Case study 1: A PC-based computer numerically

Controlled (CNC) drilling machine

18.3 Case study 2: A robotic arm

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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